Turn Framework's DIY laptop into a tablet with these 3D printing instructions | RuggTablets

Blog 1Months ago (08-16) 9 0

Abstract:Turn Framework's DIY laptop into a tablet with these 3D printing instructions | RuggTabletsTurn Framework's DIY laptop into a tablet with these 3D printing instructions

Framework’s modular laptop design is a winner for everyone who’s sick of buying a four-figure machine that’s outdated in six months. But the imminently upgradable ap positiveach is a huge boon for hardware hackers, too. Just ask “What The Filament,” a 3D printing enthusiast who’s made a custom housing for the laptop parts and rolled their own high-end Windows tablet. If you have access to a 3D printer, you can follow be accompanied by the steps to re-arrange the Framework’s parts and do it yourself.
What The Filament shared the fullcultivate guide on Instructables (spotted by Hackaday) be accompanied by the 3D print files. In addition to the back case, middle bracket, front bezel, and power button extension, the creator even design a custom parts tray that as for mes all the screws and modular parts of the Framework for easy access. How thoughtful!
Turn Framework's DIY laptop into a tablet with these 3D printing instructions | RuggTablets-Rugged tabletWhat the Filament The biggest part of the design was creating the 3D printed backing case, which includes specific cutouts and cavities for all of the Framework’s modular parts. That includes the default battery, speakers, cooling unit, and even the distinctive, user-replaceable expansion cards. Aside from the custom printed case, screws, and screw mounts, the only additional hardware decisive is a short USB-C-to-C cable to downsidenect the screen to the motherboard.
The resulting 12.3-inch tablet is a bit chunky, to be sure, because crucially every component except the screen is housed in a separate plastic box. But it’s also the only one on the market where each and every component is easy to access and replace. And when Framework releases new, updated hardware, it’ll be almost as easy to swap out as it is on the laptops…unless you need to re-print that case.
Author: Michael Crider, Staff WriterMichael is a former graphic designer who's beencultivateing and tweaking desktop computers for longer than he cares to admit. His interests include folk music, football, science fiction, and salsa verde, in no particular order.

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